VoICE : Search Immunization Evidence

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The VoICE tool is a compendium of the many direct and downstream impacts of vaccine-preventable disease and immunization. The database contains summary explanations of the link between immunization and each impact, as well as sources of evidence for each link. You can browse the VoICE tool by topic, or use the filters to find results based on topic, disease or vaccine, location and published year.

14 Key Ideas, 7 Sources
Key Idea

Tens of millions of volunteers, social mobilizers, and health workers have participated in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. The program contributes to efforts to deliver other health benefits, including health systems strengthening. Polio eradication legacy efforts include documenting and applying the lessons learned from polio eradication, and transitioning the capacities, assets and processes of polio to other key health priorities.

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Key Idea

A study in a population of urban poor in Delhi, India, which examined household and neighborhood-level determinants of childhood immunization, found that less than half of children between 1 and 3.5 years of age received complete immunization as recommended. This was significantly lower than the overall state-level average of 70% immunization coverage.

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Inequity in vaccination coverage in India was found between states, within states, in urban vs. rural. Lower parental education resulted in lower coverage, girls had lower coverage than boys and infants born to families with a large number of children also had lower coverage than others. A direct relationship between household wealth and coverage was also found.

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Key Idea

Children in Tanzania living 5 km or greater distance from the nearest healthcare facility were less likely to be immunized than children living less than 5 km from facilities. Compared to children living close a health facility, children far from a health facility had almost three times the risk of missing out on BCG, 84% higher risk of missing the third dose of DTP, and 48% higher for missing the first dose of measles-containing vaccine. Of children who did receive BCG, those living more than 5 km from facilities had a 26% more likely to received BCG vaccine late than children close to the facility.

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Key Idea

In Tanzania, poverty was found to have a negative effect on receiving vaccines on time (at the recommended age). Children in the wealthiest quintile experienced 19% fewer delays for BCG vaccination, 23% fewer delays for the third dose of DTP vaccination, and 31% fewer delays for the first dose of measles-containing vaccine, compared to children of the poorest quintile.

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Key Idea

In an analysis of of data from India’s National Family Health Survey showed that despite a decline in urban-rural and gender differences over time, girls and children residing in rural areas remained disadvantaged. Moreover regions that had the lowest gender inequality in 1992 observed an increase in gender difference over time. Similarly, urban-rural inequality increased in one region during the data collection period.

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Key Idea

A study conducted in the urban poor in Delhi, India examining household and neighborhood-level determinants of childhood immunization found that the odds of complete vaccination in children were higher if the mother was literate (1.6x), if the child was born within the city limits (2.7x), born in a health facility (1.5x), and if they belonged to the wealthiest 20% of families sampled from this poor urban area (2.5x).

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Key Idea

A study looking at WHO data from member states shows that globally, coverage of the third dose of DTP is 26% higher among children born to mothers with some secondary education compared to mothers with no education.

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Key Idea

A study conducted in the urban poor in Delhi, India found that the odds of complete vaccination were lower in female children than in male children. The female:male complete immunization coverage ratio showed only 78 females received complete immunizations per every 100 males immunized. The authors note that this gender inequity effect in immunization has not changed in many Indian states despite increasing overall vaccine coverage rates.

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Inequity in vaccination coverage in India was found between states, within states, and in urban vs. rural. Lower parental education resulted in lower coverage, girls had lower coverage than boys and infants born to families with a large number of children also had lower coverage than others. A direct relationship between household wealth and coverage was also found.

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An analysis of data from India’s National Family Health Survey designed to examine the trends and patterns of inequalities over time showed, that despite a decline in urban-rural and gender differences over time, children residing in rural areas and girls remained disadvantaged. Moreover regions that had the lowest gender inequality in 1992 showed an increase in gender difference over time. Similarly, urban-rural inequality increased in one region during the 1992–2006 data collection period.

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Key Idea

Polio eradication investments in health infrastructure have been concentrated in some of the lowest performing health systems in the world, challenged internally by geography, poverty, armed conflict, etc. These assets can be leveraged to improve the health system and immunization overall nationally.

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Key Idea

Children in slum settings have higher burdens of vaccine-preventable disease (one study found children in slums in Manila, Philippines were 9 times more likely to have tuberculosis than other urban children) and lower rates of immunization (a study in Niger found 35% coverage in slums vs. 86% in non-slum urban areas).

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Key Idea

A study conducted in the urban poor in Delhi, India examining household and neighborhood-level determinates of childhood immunization found that the odds of complete vaccination in children were higher if the mother was literate (1.6), if the child was born within the city limits (2.7), born in a health facility (1.5), and if they belonged to the wealthiest 20% of families sampled from this poor urban area (2.5).

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Globally, coverage of the third dose of DTP is 15% higher among children in the highest compared to lowest wealth quintile. However, this masks differences of up to 64% in the most inequitable countries (Nigeria).

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Inequity in vaccination coverage in India was found between states, within states, and in urban vs. rural. Lower parental education resulted in lower coverage, girls had lower coverage than boys and infants born to families with a large number of children also had lower coverage than others. A direct relationship between household wealth and coverage was also found.

View Source >

In Tanzania, poverty was found to have a negative effect on receiving vaccines on time (at the recommended age). Children in the wealthiest quintile experienced 19% fewer delays for BCG vaccination, 23% fewer delays for the third dose of DTP vaccination, and 31% fewer delays for the first dose of measles-containing vaccine, compared to children of the poorest quintile.

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Key Idea

Children [in slums] suffer from higher rates of diarrhoeal and respiratory illness, malnutrition and have lower vaccination rates. Mothers residing in slums are more poorly educated and less likely to receive antenatal care and skilled birth assistance.

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Key Idea

Tens of millions of volunteers, social mobilizers, and health workers have participated in the Global Polio Eradication Initiative. The program contributes to efforts to deliver other health benefits, including health systems strengthening. Polio eradication legacy efforts include documenting and applying the lessons learned from polio eradication, and transitioning the capacities, assets and processes of polio to other key health priorities.

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Key Idea

Globally, coverage of the third dose of DTP is 8% higher among urban dwellers compared to children raised in a rural environment.

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