VoICE Immunization Evidence

Household Catastrophic Healthcare Expenditure and Impoverishment Due to Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Requiring Hospitalization in Malaysia

Authored by: Loganathan, T., Lee, W.S., Lee, K.F., et al

Appears in:

From the VoICE Editors

This study of the cost of treating rotavirus in a large urban and in a large rural hospital in Malaysia also found that the costs of treating rotavirus were not as devastating to families treated in the rural hospital. More families treated in the rural setting were below the poverty line prior to rotavirus treatment and the authors note that many health expenses in the Malaysian health system are subsidized, to minimize out of pocket expenses in the poor rural areas. In the urban area, the poor pay as much out of pocket as the wealthy.

Key Concept

Key Evidence: Costs for treatment for rotavirus at a large urban hospital in Malaysia led one third of families to experience catastrophic health expenditures (CHC). When direct and indirect costs of treating rotavirus were considered, almost 9 in 10 families spent more than 10% of their monthly household income on treating rotavirus. In addition, 6% of families were pushed into poverty after paying for treatment.

Key Concept

Key Evidence: Costs for treatment for rotavirus at a large urban hospital in Malaysia led one third of families to experience catastrophic health expenditures (CHC). When direct and indirect costs of treating rotavirus were considered, almost 9 in 10 families spent more than 10% of their monthly household income on treating rotavirus. In addition, 6% of families were pushed into poverty after paying for treatment.

Published In

Loganathan, T., Lee, W.S., Lee, K.F., et al 2015. Household Catastrophic Healthcare Expenditure and Impoverishment Due to Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Requiring Hospitalization in Malaysia. PLOS One. 10(5).

Disease or Vaccine