VoICE Immunization Evidence

Measles vaccination improves the equity of health outcomes: evidence from Bangladesh

Authored by: Bishai, D., Koenig, M., and Khan, M.A.

Appears in:

Key Concept

Key Evidence: A study of measles vaccine in Bangladesh found that children from the poorest quintile were more than twice as likely to die than those from the least quintile in the absence of measles vaccination. The difference in mortality between unvaccinated and vaccinated was statistically significant (p<0.10) and robust across alternative measures of socioeconomic status.

Key Concept

Key Evidence: A study of the impact of measles vaccine in Bangladesh found that unvaccinated children in the poorest quintile were more than twice as likely to die as those from the least poor quintile. In addition, vaccination reduced socioeconomic status-related mortality differentials

Key Concept

Key Evidence: A study of the impact of measles vaccine in Bangladesh found that unvaccinated children in the poorest quintile were more than twice as likely to die as those from the least poor quintile. In addition, vaccination reduced socioeconomic status-related mortality differentials

Key Concept

Key Evidence: A study of measles vaccine in Bangladesh found that children from the poorest quintile were more than twice as likely to die as those from the least quintile in the absence of measles vaccination. The difference in mortality between unvaccinated and vaccinated was statistically significant (p<0.10) and robust across alternative measures of socioeconomic status.

Published In

Bishai, D., Koenig, M., and Khan, M.A. 2003. Measles vaccination improves the equity of health outcomes: evidence from Bangladesh. Health Economics. 12(5):415-9.

Disease or Vaccine