VoICE Immunization Evidence

Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease: New Zealand experience in the era of pneumococcal vaccination

Authored by: Mount V, Burton C, Jackson C, Heffernan H, Best E

Appears in:

Key Concept

Key Evidence: Despite the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in the childhood immunization program in New Zealand, the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in neonates (<30 days old) remains relatively high at 6 per 100,000 (versus 2/100,000 in the U.S.). Out of 19 cases in infants <30 days old in this study, 9 (47%) occurred during the first 7 days of life and 6 within the first 48 hours. If proven effective, maternal vaccination would cover 74% to 84% of the serotypes that infected these infants, depending on the vaccine.

Key Concept

Key Evidence: In a study of invasive pneumococcal disease in neonates in New Zealand following the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) for infants, 67% of the cases in children <7 days old were of Maori ethnicity, while Maoris make up only 27% of New Zealand’s population. This over-representation of Maoris may be due to poverty and crowded living conditions and suggests that crowded households may be slower to experience the benefits of population-wide pneumococcal vaccination.

Published In

Mount V, Burton C, Jackson C, Heffernan H, Best E 2017. Neonatal invasive pneumococcal disease: New Zealand experience in the era of pneumococcal vaccination. Aust NZ J Obstet Gynaecol. 57 (3).