VoICE Immunization Evidence: Collateral effects on health

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Collateral Effects on Health

Collateral effects can be seen when, through immunization, one disease is prevented and the incidence of other unrelated diseases or conditions also decrease as a result. This may have a direct Economic impact, although to date this has not been measured.
2 Key Ideas, 4 Sources
Key Idea

In a study of data from England & Wales, Denmark and the US, it was shown that measles infection suppresses the immune system for up to 3 years after infection, increasing the risk of death due other childhood infections during that time. This means that prevention of measles significantly impacts overall health during critical childhood years.

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An analysis in India suggested that children aged 12–59 months who did not receive measles vaccination in infancy were three times more likely to die than those vaccinated against measles. Children from lower caste households who were not vaccinated in infancy had the highest risk of mortality (odds ratio, 8.9). A 27% increase in child mortality was attributable to failure to vaccinate against measles in the study population. Measles vaccine seems to have a non-specific reducing effect on overall child mortality in this population. If true, children in lower castes may reap the greatest gains in survival.

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In a 2014 review of the non-specific effects of measles vaccines, among others, the WHO Strategic Advisory Group of Experts indicated that some studies of measles vaccine were suggestive (but not conclusive) of a beneficial effect of measles vaccine on mortality beyond the expected direct effect of the vaccine against measles.

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Key Idea

A study including thousands of children from the US state of Texas found that children born in counties with high coverage of HepB, Polio and Hib vaccines were 33%, 37% and 42% less likely to develop a specific type of leukemia than children in counties with lower coverage of each vaccine.

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A woman carrying vaccines

Search for immunization evidence

The VoICE tool allows you to search for research studies and published evidence based on a topic, location, and disease or vaccine.

Search VoICE